Stay Warm and Cozy in Your Apartment This Winter

Baby, it’s cold outside. But that doesn’t mean you should be cold inside! After once residing in a drafty 1890’s apartment, I had to learn fast how to keep warm. Hope my lessons learned keep you warm and cozy in your apartment this winter.

Light

How we dream of a bright, warm sun all cold, dark winter long. Although daylight hours are short, and the winter sun is not strong, it can help to warm your home. Keep your blinds open on sunny days. Sun streaming in your windows will help to warm your place and the sunlight will make the season seem less dreary. Once the sun sets, close up your blinds to add a layer of insulation against the cold.

Layer

When I was a kid, my dad would turn the thermostat down to 60 degrees every night. When my brother, sister, and I complained that we were cold, he’d say, “Go put on a sweater.” So layering on a sweater or sweatshirt, snuggling up with a cozy throw, and wearing warm slippers or thick socks has been a life-long tradition. Thanks, Dad!

Drafts

Take a moment to see if there is any cold air coming in around doors and windows. Draft stoppers at your door or window can really cut down on the drafts. Even a rolled up towel can help! If you have curtains on your windows, you can add a plastic shower curtain liner on hooks. You can also try wide painter’s tape to cut drafts around doors and windows without worrying about damaging the walls or trim. You can also buy foam liners for your outlets and switch plates to block cold air drafts – especially helpful on outside walls.

Bedtime

Bring on the flannel sheets and flannel jammies! Flannel is just so cozy – and inexpensive! You can also layer up your bed with extra blankets and/or a throw. Years ago, I visited some friends in Denver. I cannot even describe how cold it was in their home at night. I put newspapers under my fitted sheet and wore my coat to be the first night. The next day I discovered that they kept a basement window open all winter. Whaaat?? But guess what? After a few nights, I realized I was getting great sleep and no longer needed the newspapers or coat. To this day, I like to sleep in a cool room – but with layers of flannel, blankets, and covers.

Use Your Oven and Stove

Leave your oven door open after each use. Whether backing, roasting, or broiling, this will allow the hot air to escape and add heat to the room. However, be cautious about doing this if you have children or pets; make sure they can’t reach the hot oven door or inside the oven. And never use the oven as a primary source of heat, especially if your appliance uses natural gas. Burning natural gas for long periods can increase carbon monoxide levels in your home. Think about baking something long and slow, like a delicious, easy, loaf of bread. Make a sheet pan supper! One pan, easy clean up, warms up the kitchen.

Warm Drinks

Besides warming up your space, you also can warm yourself from the inside. Opt for hot meals, such as a cup of soup, on cold days. And consider making your own soup from scratch, like chicken soup or chili. Soup generally takes a while to cook, and the simmering pot on the stove will generate heat in the kitchen. Or how about a cup of hot chocolate or a hot toddy?

Use a Humidifier

Humid air generally feels quite a bit warmer than dry air. And running the heat in the colder months can strip your indoor air of its humidity. To balance this, consider using a humidifier. Look for the models that allow you to choose between warm and cold air; they typically cost more but are well worth it for the heating ability.

Reverse the Ceiling Fan

It might seem counterintuitive to use a ceiling fan when you’re feeling cold, but it actually can help to warm you up. Let your ceiling fan turn at a low speed in a clockwise direction during the colder months. This will help to push the warm air that rises toward the ceiling back down toward floor level.

Use Microwaveable Heating Pads

A microwavable heating pad fairly inexpensive, and  can make a huge difference when you’re cold. As an added plus, you don’t need to be near an outlet us use it. Use a heating pad on your hands and feet when you’re sitting or lying down to feel considerably warmer overall. You can even make a basic heating pad yourself by sewing dried beans inside a piece of 100 percent cotton fabric, which you then can microwave in 30-second increments until it’s at your desired temperature.

Cuddle

Snuggles really can keep you warm. We all produce heat through our metabolic processes, and lose our heat to the environment as we maintain body temperature. Increasing skin contact decreases opportunities for the heat to be lost to the environment around us. If two people are under a blanket both of their heat losses combined can increase the temperature under the blanket more quickly than either could do independently. Plus, it’s fun. Don’t forget to snuggle up with your pooch – dogs are like heat generators. Remember, “Happiness is a Warm Puppy“.

Clear Heat Vents, Registers, and Radiators

Pull furniture, curtains, and other items away from heat vents, registers, and radiators. If they’re blocked, the heat won’t be able to circulate.

Be Active

Movement generates body heat. And there are many ways to get your body temperature up by being active. For instance, you could clean the house, exercise, dance, or play a game. Consider setting a timer as a reminder to get up and move every so often, so your body doesn’t become so cold and stiff that you don’t feel like being active.

While I like to dream of being someplace warm and sunny on a cold winter’s day, the idea of cozying up in a comfy sweatshirt and fluffy slippers while sipping hot chocolate under a fuzzy throw with my pup and binge watching Netflix doesn’t sound too bad. Although I am counting the days until the pool opens. Just sayin’.

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