Apartment Gardening

 

My daughter went to college in New York, and has lived there ever since, in a variety of teeny tiny apartments. Affordable apartments in New York (wait, is that an oxymoron?) are not only small, but often times are in older buildings or homes converted into rentals; floor plans can be … strange. One of the things she learned along the way has been that despite using half her income on rent, she can dress up her place and make it look warm and welcoming with houseplants. Plant shops (also miniscule) are in every neighborhood, so many city dwellers are on the same page as she and her roommate.

Besides the beauty of houseplants, there’s also distinct health benefits.

Health Benefits

  • Improving your mood.
  • Reducing fatigue and sharpen your attention.
  • Lowering stress and anxiety.
  • Improving office performance and focus.
  • Boosting healing and pain tolerance; recover from illness faster.
  • Minimizing the occurrence of headaches by improving air quality.
  • Easing dry skin and respiratory ailments due to dry air.
  • Working with plants can be therapeutic.

Wow! That’s a lot of benefits. So, how does one get started turning an apartment into a green oasis?

Start With Sunshine

First things first, learn the light in your home. Observe the light in each room and determine how it fits in these categories:

  • Full sun: six or more hours of direct sun a day.
  • Partial sun or partial shade: four to six hours of direct sun a day.
  • Full shade: less than four hours of direct sun a day.

Once you know the light in your space, you can shop for plants. Seek out sun-loving plants, and those that prefer partial or full shade. Houseplants are usually tropicals and can take some heat, although not always direct sun. While most herbs prefer a sunny window relief from late afternoon sun in the form of shade is usually welcome.

No sun, no problem! In my office building, there are plants thriving in an interior hallway who receive light just from overhead fluorescents.  If your apartment has small or few windows, choose plants that are happiest in low light areas such as:

* Toxic to kids and pets if consumed

Where to buy?

If you are fortunate enough to live near an IKEA, you can shop for live plants and containers there. The selections are not huge, but the plants are healthy and cheap. The Home Depot has houseplants, but there’s usually a better selection at Lowe’s. Check out your local garden center as well! All these will carry containers; most will also carry potting soil. Target also has some cute containers, and some of their newly redesigned store also carry live plants!

Containers

Make sure the containers you plan to use are compatible with the growth habits of your plants. Make sure they have adequate drainage as well. If you live on an upper level, be mindful of the weight of the materials you’re carrying to your garden space. Choose lightweight containers (look for self-watering planters if you travel or forget to water), potting mix in small bags and plant caddies to conveniently move planters when it’s time to rotate; a caddy will also help protect a carpeted floor.

Soil

Use a potting soil specifically designed for containers. Potting mix is light and fluffy, efficiently circulating air and water to keep roots healthy. It’s also fairly sterile, so you won’t have to worry about bringing diseases into your apartment.

All purpose potting soil will work for most houseplants, but use cactus potting soil for cacti and succulents which prefer a very quick draining soil. An added bonus of potting soil is that it will contain fertilizer. Make sure all planters have enough drainage provided by holes in the bottom. Add a single layer of rocks or chards from a terra cotta pot to the bottom of the planter to avoid blockage of drainage due to compacted soil.

Water

No matter the plants you choose to get started gardening indoors, it’s imperative you follow a watering schedule based on each plant’s needs. Many people water their plants on the same schedule, which can lead to overwatering. Each plant has unique needs and water requirements.

Soil in terra cotta pots will dry out more quickly than plastic or fiberglass containers. A water meter is an excellent inexpensive investment to prevent over-watering. Or test the soil by poking your finger an inch or two below the surface. If it feels dry, you need to water.

Humidity

If you are growing your plants on an indoor windowsill, you might need to provide some extra humidity, especially when the heat is on. Spritzing the plants with a fine mist can help, or you can place the plants near a tray of water.

Feeding

Feed your plants on regularly according to their individual growing requirements. Adding a water-soluble fertilizer when you water is usually the easiest method. Also, note whether your potting mix has fertilizer already in it, as this typically will delay the need for you to feed your plants.

Tools

Essential tools and supplies for apartment gardening include gardening gloves, pruners, soil, water, containers for your plants and a watering can. ​

Problems

Pests and diseases have a way of finding plants no matter where you grow them, and there are no natural predators for insects indoors. Inspect your plants for problems whenever you water them or harvest. If you spot signs of pests or diseases, such as discoloring or holes in the leaves, move that plant away from the other plants until the problem is resolved.

Here’s to a healthy and beautiful home! See you at the garden center; I’ll be the one with dirt under my fingernails.

 

Resources: ApartmentList.com, The Home Depot, SustainableJunglr.com, Chatelaine.com, SwansonNursery.com, Healthline.com

Clean! Cook! Drink! Bake!

… Clean! Cook! Drink! Bake!

 

Lemons, lemons, lemons! Despite their reputation as being pucker-inducing and sour, lemons are a glorious fruit you can use in cooking, to make kid-friendly and/or adult beverages, and to replace harsh, chemical cleaners. A bowl of lemons can also add a pop of color to any room. Here are some of my favorite lemony things.

Freshen The Garbage Disposal

When my garbage disposal smells funky, I have an easy remedy to make it smell fresh. Pour white vinegar into an ice cube tray, and drop a small chunk of lemon into each section, then freeze. Drop a few of the frozen vinegar cubes into the running garbage disposal with a stream of cold water. The ice will help keep the blades sharp and clean, and the lemon helps to deodorize the disposal. Repeat the process once a week or so to keep things smelling fresh. For a quick refresh, just add lemon rinds to the disposal and grind away.

Brighten Shower Doors

Glass shower doors are like magnets for hard water stains and stubborn soap scum. You can spend loads on glass door cleaners or use a lemon to help you scrub them clean. Dip half a lemon into a small dish of kosher salt, and get scrubbing. Then stand back and admire the shine. Alternatively, spray lemon juice on the glass then scrub with a sponge dipped in baking soda.

Clean Your Place

Cover cut lemons or lemon scraps with white vinegar and steep for about a week. Using cheesecloth, strain into a clean spray bottle. This spray will clean linoleum kitchen counters, sinks, shower, toilets, bathtub, tile, stainless steel appliances, inside the fridge, and other durable, sealed surfaces; don’t use on granite, natural stone or hardwood floors or furniture. This lemony vinegar will also remove odors and flavors from cutting boards.  You’ll love the way they cut through dust and grime, as well as the invigorating lemon scent they leave behind!

Keep Bugs Out

Use lemon juice to repel pesky insects in your home. Squeeze some lemon juice into holes and cracks where you see ants coming in, and they’ll avoid the area in the future. A lemon and water spray will repel spiders, and a clove-studded lemon will keep flies away. Who knew?

Beverages

Lemon Water. Did you know that drinking lemon water everyday may decrease stress, enhance immune function, help prevent anemia, reduce your risk of kidney stones, and protect against several diseases? Squeeze a half lemon into a cup of water and start enjoying its benefits.

Lemonade. What says summer better than a tall cold glass of lemonade? Click the link for a five-star recipe to make your own.

Limoncello. Have you even tasted this Italian lemon liquor? It’s sweet and tart and the perfect little sip after a nice meal. Traditionally, it takes three weeks to make a batch of limencello, but the link contains a recipe that takes just two hours. By the way, homemade limoncello in small cute bottles makes a great gift or party favor! I’m such a fan, I even have a Limoncello T-shirt.

Sweet Treats

Lemon Rolls. I am not a baker, but during the COVID shutdown, me and about half of Americans tried our hand at baking. This recipe for lemon rolls with cream cheese frosting was a clear winner in our house.

Lemon Bars. Who doesn’t like lemon bars? And who doesn’t like Ina Garten? Ina’s recipe for lemon bars is divine and will be a smash hit at your next pot luck.

Lemon Meringue Pie. I am not a pie person (unless it’s my mom’s – she makes the BEST crust!), but a good lemon meringue pie is hard to beat. This recipe has five stars from 3,037 ratings, so it’s got to be good!

Savory Eats

Lemony Shrimp and Bean Stew. On the menu for dinner tonight. This dish also has a five star rating from over 4,100 folks. I’m going to serve it with the easiest homemade loaf of crusty bread and a simple salad of arugula, olive oil, lemon, and Parmesan – an Italian classic!

Lemony Orzo with Asparagus. For my vegetarian friends (any my sister), a delightful light orzo with lemon, asparagus, garlicky breadcrumbs, and Parmesan. In the words of Ina Garten, “How bad could that be?”

Time to run. A new Trader Joe’s just opened near me and they sell lemons by the bag. Pucker up, buttercup!

 

 

 

Staying Safe in Summertime Heat

Hot summer sun causing heat wave

Hot Sun in the Summertime

Unlike Sly and The Family Stone’s Hot Fun In The Summertimea heat wave is no fun. The extreme heat of this summer can take all the fun out of the season if we’re not careful. Let’s chat about staying safe in this summer’s heat.

But first, some background. I grew up in a small ranch-style house in northern New Jersey without air conditioning. On hot summer nights, my brother, sister, and I would sleep – or try to – on folding lounge chairs on the back patio; sometimes our friends from next door would join us in a make-shift pajama party. The huge oak tree next to the patio made us feel like we were under a leafy cathedral ceiling. We used pieces of cardboard to fan ourselves while trying to find the Big Dipper and the North Star until we finally dozed.

My folks had a box fan in one of their bedroom windows, and dad had it set to pull the hot air out of the room. To keep their room as cool as possible, their door was kept shut and the curtains were pulled. Drapes were drawn in rest of the house too, and the windows kept shut to keep out the heat and hot air. Hot summer days in the house were dark, close, and still; hot summer nights were dark and still as well and the quiet was disturbed only by the drone of mosquitos and rhythmic call of katydids.

My 87-year-old mother has lived her entire life in homes without air conditioning, and actually has trouble adjusting to air conditioned environments. But, with the extreme heat the entire country is experiencing this summer, she’s here with me in my air conditioned Kentucky home.

Despite the access to AC, this unprecedented heat wave presents other challenges to keeping our cool and enjoying the summer. What do we watch out for, how do we keep safe, and how can we still have hot fun in the summertime?

What to watch out for

 Health risks associated with heat exposure can range from milder conditions such as heat cramps to heat strokes, which can be fatal. Let’s get familiar with the symptoms of heat-related illnesses to head off potential problems.

  • Mild dehydration and heat cramps — muscle pain or spasms — may be early signs that your body is not reacting well to the environment, said Matthew Levy, an associate professor of emergency medicine at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine.
  • Heat exhaustion symptoms are more worrisome. These can include heavy sweating, elevated heart rate, nausea and vomiting, headaches, dizziness, fatigue and generally feeling unwell. Some people who are experiencing heat exhaustion might also faint. “This is where things are getting dangerous fast,” Levy said.
  • If heat exhaustion is left untreated, it may progress to heat stroke, which means the body’s core temperature has reached the point where cellular damage may start to occur.
    • The key feature of heat stroke is central nervous system dysfunction – confusion and possible seizures.
    • Another sign is lack of sweat. A dry person who’s not thinking clearly is at big risk and should seek help ASAP.

 How to stay safe

  •  Keep cool and hydrated.
  • Stay in spaces with air conditioning. If you only have a fan, experts recommend misting yourself with a spray bottle of cold water.
  • Spend time at indoor public places such as malls or libraries.
  • Go to a park, which can be five to 10 degrees cooler than indoor space.
  • When outdoors, dress in loose, lightweight, light-colored clothing and protect yourself from the sun with hats, sunglasses and sunscreen.
  • Drink plenty of water, but don’t guzzle it; drinking too much water could cause a potentially fatal condition known as hyponatremia.
  • Don’t drink excessive amounts of alcohol or caffeine, both of which can be dehydrating. A good way to know whether you’re adequately hydrated is to pay attention to the color of your urine. Dark yellow is not good; very pale yellow or clear is ideal.
  • Limit outdoor exercise to less intense workouts, and do them early in the morning or in the evenings.

 Who is at increased risk?

 Although anyone can be negatively affected by hotter temperatures if they’re not careful, certain populations are more vulnerable, including the elderlyyoung childrenathletespeople who have chronic medical conditionspregnant people and those who may be struggling with mental health issues.

If you know anyone who might be at increased risk, check in on them during heat waves and make sure they’re equipped to stay safe.

  • Invite an elderly relative to stay with you (like me and my mom!).
  • Help someone get to a community cooling center.
  • Stop by people’s homes to make sure their air conditioners are working or to bring them cold drinks.
  • NEVER leave young children or pets in cars on hot days, even if the windows are open.
  • Pets are at risk, too! Click here for tips on keeping your pet safe in the summer.

 What to do if you or someone else is sick from the heat

  •  Get into a cooler environment — preferably some place with air conditioning — as quickly as possible.
  • Lower the body’s core temperature by removing clothing and wetting skin with cold water.
  • Hydrate with cold fluids, such as water or electrolyte drinks.
  • For more severe problems like heat stroke, seek medical help immediately.
    • While waiting for assistance to arrive, it’s critical to take action. Get the person out of the heat and either into air conditioning or shade. The fastest way to cool someone down in an urgent situation is cold-water immersion — the colder, the better. If that’s not possible, pour cold water on the person’s head and clothing.

Ideas to have fun despite the heat

  • Go to a pool in your community if available. Bring water in non-glass containers.
  • Visit your neighborhood library or indoor shopping mall
  • Go the movies
  • Visit a local museum
  • Stay inside and read a good book
  • Eat ice cream
  • Go bowling
  • Try an escape room

Above all, remember that cool fun in the autumn-time will be here before you know it.

How about another shameless plug for our hard-working team of Fath Properties service professionals who are always there to keep your place cool so you can Love The Place You Live?

Resources: Washington Post, CDC

Smooth Sailing

Smooth Sailing Into the Sunset

The Jersey Shore. Perhaps you’ve heard of it? If you’re not from Jersey, you probably know of it from reality TV. (As a native Jersey Girl, I can attest that the show is not reality to the vast majority of folks who live or vacation there.) As an aside, everywhere else along the east coast the sandy strip which separates the ocean from towns and cities is called a beach. In NJ, people do not go “to the beach”; they go “down the shore”.

I spent this 4th of July holiday weekend near the shore with my brother who owns a home on Bay Head Harbor. We spent a great deal of time sitting on his deck overlooking the water and chatting about all things water and boat related. Because Bay Head Harbor connects to the Atlantic Ocean, there is almost always an interesting array of boat traffic. From large fishing boats to speed boats to luxury ocean-going vessels to large party boats to tiny one-person “sunfish” sail boats, there’s always something interesting to watch on the Harbor.

This trip I learned that the Harbor is part of the Intracoastal Waterway, a 3,000 mile inland waterway along the Atlantic and Gulf of Mexico coasts of the United States running from Boston, Massachusetts, southward along the Atlantic Seaboard and around the southern tip of Florida, then following the Gulf Coast to Brownsville, Texas. Amazingly, most of the harbor near my brother’s home is only four to five feet deep outside the main channel.

My brother pointed out one particular boat that had him drooling. He explained that the finishes on the boat were luxurious – lots of polished brass and inlaid teak – that the engines were powerful, and the cost of the vessel was exorbitant. He did not mention, what for me, is the most important feature of any boat – a bathroom. Now I’m not trying to take this tale the way of pre-teens giggling over potty talk, but seriously folks, how can one enjoy oneself for long without the comforting knowledge that a restroom is nearby?

Do you know that a bathroom on a boat is called a “head”? While my brother has been around boats all his life, he did not know why the bathroom has such a strange name. Thank goodness for Google. There I found the Index Journal with all the answers I needed, and more.

Turns out, the “head” is a nautical term that goes back to the day of the old sailing ships. The very back upper-most rear of a ship, typically known as the stern, was called the poop deck. The ship’s wheel was located in the rear of the ship near the rudder to reduce the number of pulleys and ropes needed for steering. The poop deck was elevated so the captain and pilot would have a clear view over the front of the ship. While the term “poop deck” can remind us of grade-school conversations, the name is actually quite elevated coming from the French word for the stern, “la poupe.”

When sailing, the wind ideally comes from the rear to fill the sails and propel the ship forward. During stormy and windy weather, the foam and spray from rough seas with high waves behind the ship would leave the poop deck and the captain soaked. And as you can imagine, after a day of steering in bad weather, the pilot was “pooped.”

At the front of the ship was the figurehead: often times a beautifully carved wooden figure or bust fitted on the bow of the ship. Since the wind was blowing from the rear to the front, the “head” (or front) of the ship was the best place for sailors to relieve themselves. So when the shipmates went to the toilet, they went to the head. So there you have it.

So now you (and my brother) know all about the head on a boat. Here’s hoping all your boat rides are on a vessel with a head. While most of us spend little time on the high seas, we can all agree that having a bathroom close at hand on a ship – and at home – gives one peace of mind.

As this blog is intended to focus on various aspects of apartment living, you’re probably wondering about the connection to this article’s topic. Well, it’s a shameless plug for all the hard-working service personnel at our apartment community sites who consider the smooth operation of your commode a priority – even when it gets them out of bed in the middle of the night to repair a naughty potty (if it’s the only one you have). These are the guys – and gals! – who ensure it is all smooth sailing in your Fath Properties apartment.

 

Resources: IndexJournal, Wikipedia

Summer Safety for Furry Friends

 

Some areas of the USA are experiencing record-setting high temperatures this summer while others have more rain than they can handle. Me thinks Mother Nature is a wee bit perturbed with the way we treat Mother Earth. That is a story for another day. Today we’ll talk about pet care and safety tips for the summer heat.

The news is loaded with ways to keep us humans safe during a heat wave, but what about our furry friends? We think of them in human terms as well, don’t we? Yes (emphatically), we do. But our fur babies can’t cool off by sweating like we do. Below are some summer safety tips for our furry friends.

Car Rides

“Wanna go for a ride?” is like music to most pup’s ears. But summer rides can be deadly. Watch veterinarian Ernie Ward show how quickly temperatures rise in a parked car. YIKES. Never, ever, EVER leave a pup in a parked car. Not even for a minute! Not even with the car running and air conditioner on. On a warm day, temperatures inside a vehicle can rise rapidly to dangerous levels. On an 85-degree day, for example, the temperature inside a car with the windows opened slightly can reach 102 degrees within 10 minutes. After 30 minutes, the temperature will reach 120 degrees. Your pet may suffer irreversible organ damage or die.

Although Fido may be miffed at being left at home and may munch on your favorite kicks in retribution, do it. He’ll get over it, and you wanted to buy a new pair of shoes anyway. If you’re driving with your dog in the car, bring water and a portable water dish (or this nifty water/bowl combo) and take Gus with you when you leave the car.

Download the Humane Society’s PDF for more information.

Paws

You’ve heard the phrase, “It’s hot enough to fry an egg on the sidewalk!” Yep, concrete sidewalks, asphalt, and metal can get blisteringly hot. Try to keep Moose off hot surfaces; not only can it burn paws, but it can also increase body temperature and lead to overheating. And please don’t drive around with your dog in the bed of a truck. It does not make you look cool and the hot metal can burn paws quickly. Worse yet, your dog can fall out or be injured or killed in an accident. See? Not cool. Avoid walking pups in the heat of the day and walk them on the grass. If outdoor walking on hot surfaces can’t be helped, consider some stylin’ booties or paw wax to protect those sweet Fritos-scented feets.

Water and Shade

Bring a portable doggie dish and plenty of water available to avoid dehydration. Relax in the shade as much as possible or bring your own.

Pet Sunscreen

Even very furry dogs can also be prone to sunburn if their nose, ears, belly, and other sensitive areas aren’t covered with pet sunscreen. Hairless breeds must be protected when outdoors, as they are more susceptible to sunburn and skin cancer. Never use human grade sunscreen on pets as it is toxic. Opt for a sunscreen suitable for pets.

Protective Clothing

Putting Cookie Crumb in a shirt may seem counterintuitive (but adorable!) when it is hot outside. However, some doggie clothes can help keep Ollie cool and shaded. If Rascal has short fur, light colored fur, or is hairless, you can opt for sunscreen clothing for pets. Dogs that are sensitive to the sun’s rays might enjoy doggles, or pet sunglasses.

Haircuts

Should you shave your dog’s fur or hair? WAIT! If you have a double-coated breed like a Golden Retriever, Border Collie, Aussie, Sheltie, Newfoundland or Bernese Mountain Dog, the answer is NOPE. Ready all about it here. For other breeds, read this before giving FiFi a new do.

Cookouts & Picnics

They will beg. They will plead. They will droll. So much. While dining al fresco is loads of fun, the food and drinks offered can be bad for dogs. Keep Lily and Poppy away from alcohol and foods like grapes, onions, and chocolate and other foods Taxi should not consume.

Fireworks

Many dogs are fearful of loud noises, especially fireworks. The dangers are obvious – pets are at risk for fatal injuries and painful burns if they are allowed to run around freely when fireworks are being used. Some fireworks also contain chemicals toxic to pets like potassium nitrate and arsenic. And remember, their hearing is many times better than ours. Don’t believe me? Try whispering, “Chicken?” and see what happens.

Keep Chester indoor with the TV or music playing to lessen the disruption. Your vet can also recommend something that will calm your pup if he’s very, very afraid.

Indoor Fun

Those days when it’s just too dang hot to go anywhere, perhaps a game of the Invisible Food Challenge could be fun?

So while you are enjoying Hot Fun In The Summertime, keep Peanut Chillin’ In The Summertime.

 

Resources: Humane Society, Pet Health Network, Shiloh Veterinary Hospital, ASPCA, 5 Points Animal Hospital, Pets WebMD

Home Office 2021 Edition

Designated Home Office Space

“I get to work from home in my jammies?!? Hurrah!” That’s what you were thinking when your company sent you home to work because of the 2020 Pandemic, right? It’s what we were all thinking. Here we are over a year later and you have to admit – the thrill is gone. While many of us are back to work, many of us are still working remotely full-time or part-time. We miss our co-workers, lunches out, happy hours after work, wearing something other than sweats, and being able to just work without all the distractions working at home bring. And the guilt. You know, “As long as I am home, shouldn’t I prepare a great meal for dinner this evening? Why am I behind on my laundry? Where did all this dust come from?”  We feel you, and hopefully can help.

HAVE A DESIGNATED SPACE

Keeping your “work” space separate from your “living” space really helps when you work from home. If you’re renting a new apartment and know you’ll be working from home, look for one that has one more bedroom, a den, a larger living room or a cozy nook than can become your office. Having a designated space will allow you to feel like you’re at work, while also making it easier to “turn off” at night and maintain a strong work-life balance. Investing in a decent chair will really helps to avoid the inevitable fanny fatigue you’ll suffer from sitting in a dining chair. If a  new chair is out of reach, a chair pad can make all the difference (plus you can take it on road trips!).

TAKE BREAKS

Sitting at a desk all day can drain your energy and motivation. Set up intervals where you can take quick breaks, even if it’s just to get up and stretch your legs or make a coffee. Taking small breaks every 90 minutes or so actually increases productivity, so don’t be afraid to step away from your work to help you focus better and keep your sanity while you’re at your desk.

SCHEDULE YOUR DAY

Working at home means working on your own more often. This cuts down on the distractions that tend to happen in an office environment, but it can also be difficult to keep yourself on track with no one else around. Planning your day and following a solid task list is a great way to hold yourself accountable. While completing a task, try not to take phone calls, answer emails, or shift from that task until it is finished.

KEEP A ROUTINE

Having a regular routine will help you stay productive. This extends outside of your work hours to include a regular bedtime, wake-up time, and work time. Choose a time that you will start work each day, and stick to it. Plan everything else around it, including your meals. Take time to get ready each morning and take a lunch break every day just as you would if you went to an office for work. And wear something nice to work at least once a week. Give your jammies a rest.

 

 

 

Don’t Be Them

Frowning Mom and Son Sit on Couch with Closed Eyes and Plugged Ears from Upstairs Noise

What’s Going On Up There?!?

As an apartment dweller, you share at least one wall with another resident. And, you probably hear your neighbor from time to time. It’s to be expected. Have you ever seen the video Everyone’s Upstairs Neighbor? Back when it was created, The Washington Post wrote:

            Chances are what’s causing the movements of humans above you to sound like a giant’s conga line is a thin or poorly-insulated ceiling. But when the thumping begins at all the wrong times, you know you can’t help but wonder: are they doing that on purpose?

The experience is universal enough that when comedy writer Matt Moskovciak pretended the answer was yes, it’s on purpose, he created the most successful online video of his career.

Of course the video is hilariously exaggerated, but it does make one wonder: “Is that how I sound to my neighbors?” Yikes.

Keeping that in mind, strive to be the neighbor you wish you would always have.

  • Offer a smile and a wave to your neighbors when you see them.
  • Step outside your apartment and listen to the volume of your music, TV, gaming, etc. If you can hear it, bet your neighbors can, too. Consider using headphones after 10:00 PM and before 9:00 AM if you like to pump up the volume.
  • Planning to throw a party? Let your neighbors know what to expect and for how long – and perhaps extend them an invitation to join in the fun.

These simple steps can go a long way toward shared enjoyment of life in your apartment building and apartment community.

On the other hand, what can you do if it’s your neighbors making too much noise and commotion on their side of the wall? The simplest (though not always easiest) solution is to knock on their door and ask them to keep down any noise that they can control (electronics, a barking dog, etc.). You can explain you need your sleep, that you’re working from home, etc. A heart-to-heart with your neighbor will always be better received than getting management involved. But if you are faint of heart, another option is to contact your management company and ask them to issue a general email to all residents about noise. This keeps you (or your neighbor) from being singled out, but ideally will get the message across. If that fails, you can have your management company contact your neighbor directly, without implicating you. A good set of ear plugs and a white noise machine or app on your phone can also work wonders.

Be a great neighbor and get one in return. Without the bowling balls.

 

Out, Damned Spot; Out I Say!

illustrates damage from red wine spills

Out Damned Spot

Racked with guilt over her complicity in murder, Shakespeare’s Lady Macbeth famously exclaims, “Out, damned spot; out I say!” while wringing her hands to remove a hallucinated bloodstain. You may be tempted to say something similar – or much worse – when you’re suddenly faced with a horrifying spill of red wine on your carpet.

It’s always a sad moment when that delicious glass of red winds up on the floor instead of in your belly. My good friend Stacy never fails to drip, dribble, spill, or splash whenever we get together. I have honestly never met anyone as clumsy with food and drink as she. Fortunately for us both, she is also a wizard at removing stains from everything – including carpet – with products you already have in your home.  Her advice?

  • Blot Up ASAP. Gently blot with paper towels from the outside edge of the spill to the center. Act quickly before the wine’s natural dyes and acids work their way into the carpet fibers.
  • Select a Solution. See four options below:
    • Straight club soda.
    • One tablespoon each of white vinegar and liquid dish soap mixed in two cups warm water.
    • Table salt – enough to cover the spill.
    • Wine removal product such as Wine Away (under $10 from Amazon).
  • Test Solution. Test the solution on a small inconspicuous area for colorfastness.
  • Dab and Blot. Dab your solution of choice in small amounts on the spill with a soft, clean white cloth (an old T-shirt will do nicely!), again working your way from the outside of the spot to the center. Don’t be tempted to dump the mixture all over the stain as it will cause it to spread and may damage the carpet’s backing.
    • NOTE: If using salt, cover the stain, let sit until dry, then vacuum.
  • Rinse. Rinse the cloth frequently to avoid spreading or reintroducing the wine to the area.
  • Rest. Let everything sit for five to 10 minutes.
  • Rinse Again. Rinse the area with cold water.
  • Blot and Repeat. Blot with a white towel. Repeat until no more color transfers to the towel.

Theoretically, you can use white wine to remove a red wine stain following the steps above. If wasting any wine on a spill shocks you to your core, consider having vinegar or salt or Wine Away at the ready before you pop the cork.

Cheers!

 

 

Memorial Day 2021

As we express our gratitude, we must never forget that the highest

appreciation is not to utter the words, but to live by them.

—John F. Kennedy, 35th President of the United States

 

Originally known as Decoration Day, Memorial Day originated in the years following the Civil War and became an official federal holiday in 1971. Many Americans observe this holiday by visiting cemeteries or memorials, holding family gatherings and participating in parades, but Memorial Day is/should be much more than an excuse to party over a three-day weekend. Here are some facts to give this important US holiday some perspective.

 

Memorial Day Beginnings

  • Approximately 620,000 soldiers lost their lives during the Civil War.
  • In the years following the war, women placed flowers on the graves of their fallen soldiers. Two years later 219 Civil War veterans marched through Carbondale, IL to Woodlawn Cemetery in memory of the fallen, where Union hero Major General John A. Logan delivered the principal address. The ceremony gave Carbondale its claim to the first organized, community-wide Memorial Day observance.
  • Waterloo, New York, began holding an annual community service on May 5, 1866. Although many towns claimed the title, it was Waterloo that won congressional recognition as the “Birthplace of Memorial Day.”

 

Major General John A. Logan Make Memorial Day Official

  • General Logan was commander of the Grand Army of the Republic, an organization of Union veterans. On May 5, 1868, he issued General Order No. 11, which set aside May 30, 1868, “for the purpose of strewing with flowers, or otherwise decorating the graves of comrades who died in defense of their country during the late rebellion.” The orders expressed hope that the observance would be “kept up from year to year while a survivor of the war remains to honor the memory of his departed comrades.

 

Decoration Day

  • Originally known as Decoration Day for the practice of decorating graves with flowers, wreaths, and flags, federal law declared “Memorial Day” the official name in 1967.

 

The Holiday

  • Federal Memorial Day, established in 1888, allowed Civil War veterans, many of whom were drawing a government paycheck, to honor their fallen comrades without losing a day’s pay.
  • New York was the first state to designate Memorial Day a legal holiday in 1873.
  • After World War I, the purpose of Memorial Day was broadened to honor those who died in all our country’s wars.
  • In 1971, Memorial Day shifted from May 30 to the last Monday in May.

 

First Memorial Day at Arlington National Cemetery

  • On May 30, 1868, President Ulysses S. Grant presided over the first Memorial Day ceremony at Arlington National Cemetery—which, until 1864, was Confederate General Robert E. Lee’s plantation.
  • James A. Garfield, a Civil War general, Republican Congressman from Ohio, and future president delivered a speech lasting almost two hours.

 

Rolling Thunder

  • On Memorial Day weekend in 1988, 2500 motorcyclists rode into Washington, D.C. for the first Rolling Thunder rally to draw attention to Vietnam War soldiers still missing in action and prisoners of war. By 2002, the ride had swelled to 300,000 bikers, many of them veterans, and in 2018 the numbers were closer to half a million.
  • Although reported that 2019 would be the group’s last Memorial Day ride, American Veterans (AMVETS) continued the tradition in the midst of the COVID-19 pandemic. Now known as Rolling to Remember, 2020’s ride participants each rode 22 miles through their own community for a Virtual Memorial Day. Traveling 22 miles is significant, because in addition to raising awareness for soldiers missing in action and prisoners of war, AMVETS wanted to bring attention to the average 22 veterans who die by suicide every day.

 

Customs, Firsts, Dedications

  • It is customary on Memorial Day to fly the flag at half-staff until noon, and then raise it to the top of the staff until sunset.
  • The World War I poem “In Flanders Fields,” by John McCrea, inspired the Memorial Day custom of wearing red artificial poppies.
  • In 1915, a Georgia teacher and volunteer war worker named Moina Michael wore a red silk poppy and began a campaign to make the poppy a symbol of tribute to veterans and for “keeping the faith with all who died.”
  • The first Indianapolis 500 ran on May 30, 1911. The winning driver was Ray Harroun who averaged 74.6 mph and completed the race in six hours and 42 minutes.
  • The Lincoln Memorial was dedicated on May 30, 1922 by Supreme Court Chief Justice (and former president) William Howard Taft. Lincoln’s surviving son, Robert Todd Lincoln attended.
  • In 2000, Congress established a National Moment of Remembrance, which asks Americans to pause for one minute at 3:00 PM in an act of national unity. The time was chosen because “is the time when most Americans are enjoying their freedoms on the national holiday.”

 

Fath Properties remembers and honors all our fallen soldiers and their families. We wish each you a safe and enjoyable Memorial Day.

 

Sources: MentalFloss, Wikipedia

How To Shop For An Apartment During A Pandemic

Shopping for an apartment can be an anxiety-inducing process, even during normal market conditions. In today’s climate, it is not as simple as checking off the routine amenities and features such as a pool, fitness center, walk-in closets and washer/dryer connections; now you have to consider, can I enjoy these amenities safely and are these items still my must-haves. For many, 2020 has made apartment home shoppers reevaluate what is important to them when selecting their new home.

Things to consider

– Has the pandemic brought changes to how you work and live?
– Are you now working from home and/or having to homeschool your children?

Does your current space allow you to do this effectively? If not, what type of space would help make this possible; a den, breakfast nook or an extra bedroom to convert to an office? Click Here for some ideas on how to makeover your space.

– Have you modified your hobbies or your normal routine due to the pandemic?

Consider the activities in your life that you have had to modify and evaluate what features could help with this transition. Would having flex space that you could utilize for a home gym assist in your new goals? What about a larger kitchen with a dishwasher while you practice your newly honed sous chef skills? Would having washer/dryer connections ease the anxiety of having to go to a crowded laundry mat? What about a nice sized balcony or patio to allow for some fresh air? Unsure how to utilize your flex space- check out this article.

What Covid-19 precautions have the community put in place to assist their client’s needs?

Has the community put Covid-19 safety solutions in place to allow residents to enjoy their amenities safely? Are the business centers, gyms and pools designed to allow for social distancing? Are there online options to pay rent, submit service requests, apply online and complete the move-in process? Does the community offer Virtual and Self-Guided tours? Do they have informative websites with features like 3D floorplans and 360 tours? To check out what these features look like, CLICK HERE.

 

With experts stating that our current environment could become the “New Normal” and that we may be social distancing and utilizing mask usage we must consider all these factors. With 42% of people working from home in 2020 (a 39.5% increase from 2019), our home plays a much larger role in our lives than ever before. Identifying what you need to make the most of your new home will help to ensure a smooth apartment home search during these unprecedented times.